News

Zoom around Gale Crater using your web browser Monday, August 6, 2012
Explore Gale Crater, landing site for NASA's new Mars rover Curiosity, using your browser!
THEMIS data suggest early Gale Crater targets for rover Thursday, August 2, 2012
THEMIS data covering Gale Crater point to hardened sediments near an alluvial fan that will likely become an early target for NASA's Curiosity rover.
THEMIS celebrates a decade's discoveries Tuesday, February 28, 2012
In the last decade, the THEMIS camera has circled Mars nearly 45,000 times and taken more than half a million images.
In memory: Planetary geologist Ronald Greeley Friday, October 28, 2011
Ronald Greeley, a Regents' Professor of Planetary Geology at ASU who contributed significantly to our understanding of the solar system, died October 27, in Tempe.
THEMIS keeps an eye on Mars for dust Tuesday, January 11, 2011
Scientists are using THEMIS to detect seasonal and yearly changes in dust activity and to track the development of dust storms.
THEMIS: All-Star images Thursday, December 9, 2010
THEMIS presents a hit parade slide show of images, as NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter becomes the longest-duration Mars spacecraft.
Putting the spin on Mars Wednesday, November 10, 2010
Wrapping spacecraft data onto Mars globes gives new perspectives on the Red Planet.
THEMIS camera yields best Mars map ever Friday, July 23, 2010
The best Mars map ever assembled is now online for planetary scientists and armchair astronauts alike — and citizen scientists are invited to help make it even better.
iPhone app delivers daily THEMIS Mars images Friday, June 18, 2010
A free iPhone app delivers THEMIS Images of the Day to your device.
Middle school students find cave on Mars Thursday, June 17, 2010
Using THEMIS, middle-school science students discover what may be a hole in the roof of a lava tube cave on Mars.
Updated THEMIS mosaics of MSL landing site candidates Friday, March 26, 2010
New data from THEMIS is helping scientists choose a landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), NASA's next-generation rover spacecraft, due for launch in 2011.
New orbit gives THEMIS better looks at Mars minerals Monday, June 15, 2009
Moving NASA's Mars Odyssey to a different orbit has increased the sensitivity and efficiency of THEMIS.
THEMIS lets you find your place on Mars Tuesday, April 21, 2009
A new feature in Google Earth 5.0 lets anyone, anywhere suggest places on Mars for THEMIS to photograph.
Sideways look from THEMIS probes Mars atmosphere Thursday, May 29, 2008
On May 25, 2008, the Phoenix lander arrived at Mars and raced to a safe touchdown on the northern plains. At the same time, NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter turned its radio antenna to listen for signals from the spacecraft and relayed them to mission controllers on Earth.
THEMIS helps Phoenix land safely on mars Wednesday, May 21, 2008
ASU's Thermal Emission Imaging System helped scientists find a safe landing site for the Mars Phoenix spacecraft - and the instrument is also giving flight controllers essential data on the atmosphere to ensure a safe touchdown.
Salt deposits found in Martian highlands Wednesday, March 19, 2008
Deposits of chloride (salt) minerals found on Mars using THEMIS may provide evidence for the existence of former Martian life.
Mars image milestone for THEMIS web site Thursday, May 3, 2007
Lava flows and wind streaks mingle with impact craters in the 1,200th THEMIS Image of the Day.
Ground ice on Mars is patchy and variable Tuesday, May 1, 2007
For the first time, scientists have found that water ice lies at variable depths over small-scale patches on the Red Planet.
Gas jets spawn dark 'spiders' and spots on Mars icecap Tuesday, August 15, 2006
Every spring it happens. As the Sun peeks above the horizon at the Martian south polar icecap, powerful jets of carbon-dioxide (CO2) gas erupt through the icecap's topmost layer. The jets climb high into the thin, cold air, carrying fine, dark sand and spraying it for hundreds of feet around each jet.
Orbital eyes picked Mars rover Opportunity's landing site Thursday, December 1, 2005
On January 24, 2004 - one Mars year ago - NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity arrived at Mars. After a tense, high-speed entry and descent, the rover, tightly cocooned in airbags, bounced and rolled to a stop inside tiny Eagle Crater on Mars' Meridiani Planum. The landing, which made an interplanetary hole-in-one, was flawless.
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